J O U R N A L

Canada West 1841–1867  (Upper Canada 1791–1841, Ontario, 1867–)

Digging up bones. Central School. Brantford

“…he was startled and dismayed when a finger bone flowed out of the pump.” A look at Brantford Central School By Ruth Lefler [excerpted]Friday, May 30, 2014  The first Central School building stood on the north side of Sheridan Street on the site of Brantford’s first municipal cemetery. Egerton Ryerson, founder of Ontario’s education system,… Read more …

Listen at audiobooks.com

ERIC Svilpis                                 ELIJAH Lucian                              KAELA Caron                          SHEENA MacDonald          … Read more …

Magdalene Asylums/Laundries: Philomena

“We were ostracized because we’d committed a mortal sin. It was really hammered into you.” Philomena Lee Christian Magdalene Laundries start in the 18th century in England/Ireland, go international and, back in Ireland, close only two decades ago. Named after Mary of Magdala, a complex Biblical presence and so-called prostitute, the Magdalene Laundries (and Asylums) house their communities’ fallen… Read more …

Pleasant Hill Cemetery: “..by our lack of ghosts we’re haunted”

Since we had always sky about, when we had eagles they flew out leaving no shadow bigger then wrens’ to trouble our most aeromantic hens. Too busy bridging loneliness to be alone we hacked in ties what Emily etched in bone. We French, we English, never lost our civil war, Endure it still, a bloodless civil bore; No wounded lying about, no… Read more …

Skunny Wundy by A C Parker

Arthur Caswell Parker was an archaeologist at the Peabody Museum (Harvard) and the New York State Museum, an ethnologist at the New York State Library, and director of the Rochester (N.Y.) Museum of Arts and Sciences. He was also an editor and an author, writing primarily on the history of the Iroquois. Parker was a… Read more …

Native Nations’ Perspective on the War of 1812

Following entry written by Donald Fixico: “The War of 1812 was an important conflict with broad and lasting consequences, particularly for the native inhabitants of North America. During the pivotal years before the war, the United States wanted to expand its territories, a desire that fueled the invasion of native homelands throughout the interior of… Read more …

Jennet’s space

UXBRIDGE in 1830s-40s “About 1840, dissension among the Quakers caused a division amongst the congregation, and the dissenters moved north, where they built themselves a new place of worship on the corner of William Ferguson’s farm, on the 6th conc.”   Hvidsten, J Peter, Uxbridge: the First 100 Years. 1800-1900. Port Perry: Observer Publishing of Port… Read more …

ORANGE Toronto

TORONTO IN 1840s. Orangeism spreads to the Colonies. The Orange Order makes life for Catholics grim for a while, certainly in terms of holding public office. “The Orange Society was introduced into the Army, and no fewer than 32 regiments were known to have received warrants for holding lodges in Ireland, and the English Grand Lodge issued 37… Read more …

Joseph Brant 1743-1807: man of two worlds

To date Isabel Thompson Kelsay has written the definitive study of Joseph Brant.  (See, however, James Paxton’s brief and shiny tome Joesph Brant and his world: 18th century Mohawk warrior and statesman for a better thesis than Kelsay’s on Brant’s view of a sovereign Grand River territory. Paxton’s book reviewed elsewhere on this site.) Kelsay’s research is comprehensive. Her style is readable…. Read more …

Loyalism after 1812 births Idle No More

Royal is a Canadian millstone. Especially when royal and loyal turn fanatical. Canada’s being a monarchy acts to the detriment of the Rest of Canada’s (ROC) enduring relationship with Québec. Canada’s relationship with the United States is complex enough without our government’s clinging to the crazy outdated ideal that we owe primary loyalty to a foreign country. Our not moving out… Read more …