Sara Jeannette Duncan: There was nearly always a lacrosse match on the Queen’s Birthday. 

Kent Monkman – Ojibwe lacrosse player


Canada West 1841–1867  (Upper Canada 1791–1841, Ontario, 1867–)

The Grand River Navigation Company Swindle

Speaking of not paying . . . The [Grand River Navigation Company] never pays the Six Nations for non-surrendered expropriated land nor returns a single penny of investment but most remarkable is this turnaround: the canal company is forever in need of cash infusions and uses up Six Nations’ capital monies in fifteen years. The Navigation wrings so… Read more …

Devil Joseph Brant

Who is Thayendanegea Joseph Brant, and why should Canada know him?   Haudenosaunee writers, people such as Rick Monture, fool themselves into believing they’re walking the fine line when, to solve any conflict, they adopt a kind of placating tall-poppy resolution (the beloved Canadian equivocation). Our poppy scythe cuts down everybody to the same level… Read more …

The Markham Gang Ontario

“Gang members took an oath of secrecy. They vowed to support each other in any way possible. They pledged to provide alibis in case they were arrested, and to back each other in court. This was a homegrown, nineteenth century Canadian ‘Mafia,’ a ‘mob,’ one of the earliest known cases of organized crime in British… Read more …

Loyalism births Idle No More

Royal is a Canadian millstone. Especially when royal and loyal turn fanatical. Canada’s being a monarchy acts to the detriment of the Rest of Canada’s (ROC) enduring relationship with Québec. Canada’s relationship with the United States is complex enough without our government’s clinging to the crazy outdated ideal that we owe primary loyalty to a foreign country. Our not moving out… Read more …

Joseph Brant and his “mansion”

There is much to love in James Paxton’s Joseph Brant and his world: 18th century Mohawk warrior and statesman (2008) – exceptional writing and heart-rending illustrations and even the book’s silky pages. More to love is Paxton’s thesis: Joseph Brant is an 18th century Mohawk warrior and Pine Tree Chief who understands as well as any modern Canadian the necessity… Read more …

Kent Monkman rewrites history to suit his purposes––just like colonials do.

Joseph Brant and his slaves

Historians comment on Joseph Brant’s compassion. Here are two (perhaps unexpected) voices to add to the list. Sophia Pooley. Prince van Patter. First Nations practice capture-slavery before Europeans arrive. Having no penitentiaries, Indigenous either kill or enslave captives of war. Indigenous slaves can prove valuable to the slaver society and, therefore, may be allowed through marriage or… Read more …

Mohawk trilogy

Canadian folkways lean on immigrants’ and Indigenous’ stories. In Minsos Mohawk trilogy “the complexities of the era are thoroughly researched and accurately imparted, as evidenced by the detail in both the book and its lengthy introduction. These historical trials are never intrusive in the text; they are always incorporated in a relatable way.” Lillian Brown… Read more …

Trumpeting the Mohawk trilogy

Thanks and boundless appreciation for support and kindness go to Fay Boer, Lesley Clarke, Kathy van Denderen, Dianne Gillespie, Jennifer Gobeil, Anita Jenkins, Ove Minsos, Laraine Orthlieb, and Sally Williams.  Lillian Brown: Despite being set over a century ago, [Charter] tackles the intricacies of gender inequality and social relationships in a relatable manner, tying the struggles… Read more …

Ruthven Park, Indiana, Ontario

Ruthven Park’s founder is David Thompson. The lie Ruthven Park tells, through omission, is one with both a long nose (plain to see) and short legs (doesn’t withstand historical scrutiny). David Thompson 1 (1793 – 1851) is not a law-abiding person nor an honourable businessman. A bold Scot and a fascinating character, he is a… Read more …

Huronia and the plague(s)

“After first contacts with Europeans and Africans, some believe that the deaths of 90–95% of the native population of the New World was caused by Old World diseases. It is suspected that smallpox was the chief culprit and responsible for killing nearly all of the native inhabitants of the Americas. For more than 200 years,… Read more …