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November 2022: Proportional Representation in Canada, Yea or Nay?

November 2022: Proportional Representation in Canada, Yea or Nay?

November 2022  Question: Would proportional representation be good for Canada? YES or NO This column takes up the NO side, lauding the Senate of Canada. Ranked ballots are another issue. S. Minsos (PhD University of Alberta, BA Western) believes if you see something you like about Canada in Bill Browder’s Freezing Order, you might want to explore her theory: Culture Clubs: The Real Fate Of Societies. Homo sapiens are herding, mannerly animals. Browder:  “. . . on October 4 [2017] The Canadian…

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Trumpeting

Trumpeting

Thinking outside the cultural box, a.k.a., the culture club. The Flammarion engraving, unknown artist, first appears in Camille Flammarion’s 1888 book L’atmosphère: météorologie populaire.  Acknowledgments To publishers, and for the help of others throughout the publishing process – art, readings, editing, design, proofing, production, indexing, and book-club readings  – the writer extends deep appreciation: Christi Belcourt, Faye Boer, Janine Brodie, Lesley Clarke, DELC, Murray Dorin (1954-2020), Gerry Dotto, Judy Dunlop, Stephen Gibb, Dianne Gillespie, Jennifer Gobeil, Bruce E. Hill, Kiff Holland,…

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Tehawennihárhos: Charter. Historical fiction.

Tehawennihárhos: Charter. Historical fiction.

Evolution and natural selection don’t “care” what specific culture clubs humans make. Playing the matrix social game is what’s important. As long as we continue to make and remake culture clubs (in the face of changing affordances/contexts), the socialization game is working as selected.  Affordances of the past lead us to appreciate the value of well researched historical fiction. Feature Artist ©Stephen Gibb INTRODUCTION to Tehawennihárhos: Charter 1845 -46 So what about Canada West in 1845? How can a writer build…

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Culture Clubs: The Real Fate of Societies

Culture Clubs: The Real Fate of Societies

Whatever you face as an individual or a culture club determines choices. Whatever the affordance [situation, context, environment, economy], and however painful the affordance may be, individuals and culture clubs still and forever confront (and use) the laws of science. Eg., COVID-19 is an unexpected affordance.  We must deal with it. How? We deal with a new affordance by adopting new manners. (In Weird Tit-for-Tat, manners are generously defined as policies, civilities, folkways, laws.) One the one hand, national dominators…

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In the footsteps of First Nations (Métis and Inuit)

In the footsteps of First Nations (Métis and Inuit)

Frances Anne Beechey Hopkins (1838–1919), Canoe Manned by Voyageurs Passing a Waterfall (1869). (LAC) CC0 In Hopkins’ painting Canadians will appreciate our home-grown paradoxes. There are French, Métis and Indigenous voyageurs, everyone showing healthy goodness and worthy effort, and then one spots two small English settlers, doing nothing much to help the cause as they voyage en route to their destination at Lachine (Hudson’s Bay Company). Edward Hopkins, the bearded gentleman, has a blanket over his knees. The little woman,…

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Mohawk trilogy

Mohawk trilogy

Canadian folkways lean on immigrants’ and Indigenous’ stories. The Women Review: “Sky Walker Tehawennihárhos: Charter is a complex, action-filled novel about the 1840s in Canada West [formerly Upper Canada, now Ontario].  …Leading us through the suspenseful plot, filled with humour and emotion, Minsos writes spare, clean prose. The late Mel Hurtig once said about her style, ‘Every word is right.’ In Minsos’ books we witness survival struggles, stereotypical biases and gender inequity. We follow the trail of shady land sharks and…

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HERMIT

HERMIT

Missus Byrd was primal. The Seneca Seer. Tell her your name. She will tell you your fortune. Young Miss Converse thought to benefit from knowing her fortune and with that in mind she went straightway to the fortuneteller’s house. Pink hollyhocks grew in front of Missus Byrd’s window. Veiny beet tops and spidery squash vines and three rows of corn grew beside the house. Behind the garden was a coop. Three Rhode Island reds pecked at grubs and snubbed the…

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