J O U R N A L

 

Canada West 1841–1867  (Upper Canada 1791–1841, Ontario, 1867–)

 

 

Grand River Saga

Lost when it comes to pre-Confederation events? Fascinated with Canadian history? If that’s you, try the Sky Walker books (the Mohawk Trilogy). It’s all about the characters. Struggling outliers have run-ins with their wild environs. They dodge lawless American and European settlers. Protagonists are helpless to stop the dirty deeds of rapacious land speculators. Characters can… Read more …

David Thompson 1, Ruthven Park, lies with long noses and short legs

“Anyone who investigates the Grand River Navigation Company knows very well that Indiana’s David Thompson 1 [not the map-maker] is a master of financial manipulation and common skullduggery. “In glossing over Thompson’s story with its nothing-to-see-here brochures and bland website information and chummy references to ‘David,’ Ruthven Park tells a long-nosed lie. “In sugar-coating David… Read more …

Sky Walker Tehawennihárhos: CHARTER

Lillian Brown, Clarion Foreword reviewer: The novel’s lovable, intricate characters and the challenges that they face every day, from protecting their lands to safeguarding their hearts, are an irresistible draw. The satisfying third and final book in S. Minsos’s historical trilogy, Sky Walker Tehawennihárhos Charter follows the nineteenth-century disruption to Indigenous lands caused by European… Read more …

Trumpeting the books

Jane Ainslie: Book 3 of the Mohawk Trilogy transports the reader to the lawless era of the mid-1800’s in central Canada. The compelling adventure in Charter picks up where The Battle of Vinegar Hill (book 2) leaves off, and the reader is fully engaged. Minsos weaves the complex story through the eyes of an intriguing cast of characters representing… Read more …

From 1775-1812: American folkways come to Upper and Lower Canada

The American Revolution blazes an immediate trail to British Québec and the blazing trail continues into Upper and Lower Canada until 1815.  Ruth McConnell says the immediate effect of the American Revolution (1775-1783) is south-to-north immigration, which carries on, unbroken, until around the end of the next civil war (1815). “American settlers continued to move… Read more …

The War of 1812: the Bloody Assize and the hangings revisited

Bloody Assize revisited, 17 May 2012: 3 articles from The Hamilton Spectator   Artist Lori LeMare speaks about the paintings she did for the War of 1812 exhibit at Fieldcote Museum. The legs of the men hanged for being traitors are seen behind her. Hamilton Spectator By Mark McNeil  It must have been an incredible… Read more …

The Grand River Navigation Company Swindle

Upper Canada’s William Hamilton Merritt and David Thompson 1 are entrepreneurs and visionaries and they catch a bug. They catch “canal fever,” which, along with malaria, is running rampant on this continent in the 1830s. “Canal fever” is an unhealthy obsession with building canals–a pun on the mosquito-born illnesses that plague the navvies who do the digging and… Read more …

GANGS OF TORONTO: The Markham Gang c 1840

“Gang members took an oath of secrecy. They vowed to support each other in any way possible. They pledged to provide alibis in case they were arrested, and to back each other in court. This was a homegrown, nineteenth century Canadian ‘Mafia,’ a ‘mob,’ one of the earliest known cases of organized crime in British… Read more …