The Grand River. Ouse. Tinaatoua.

The Grand River is situated  in southwestern Ontario. From its source near Wareham it flows southeast through the Grand valley–Fergus, Elora, Waterloo, Kitchener, Galt/Cambridge, Paris, Brantford, Ohsweken, Caledonia, and Cayuga–before emptying into the north shore of Lake Erie south of Dunnville at Port Maitland.

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In 1784 the Grand River/Tinaatoua and lands adjacent to the river for six miles on either side, including timber and minerals, were the property and within the sovereignty of the Six Nations Confederacy, allies of the British Crown during the American rebellion of 1776-1783. The Six Nations are Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga and Tuscarora. For sixty years after the birth of the USA, the Crown and the Family Compact colluded to overwhelm the Confederacy’s territory with settlers. They manipulated the people into surrendering land via the Grand River Navigation Company swindle. Issues of land claims and Haudenosaunee sovereignty remain before the courts.

feature image: catching fish in a weir

1 Grand River, photo credit Eric Praetzel

 

 

Stories that feature The Grand River. Ouse. Tinaatoua.

BROOKLEA-Davisville

Davis Hamlet or Davisville is on the farm of Mohawk Chief Thomas Tehonwawenkaragwen Davis. Currently the site of Laurier University and Professor Gary Warrick’s archaeological dig, Davisville is situated northwest of Ohsweken and Brantford, and south of Paris. Davisville is there some time before the European villages of Brantford or Paris exist. And before Davisville, Haudenosaunee... Read more …

Bella Davis – daughter of Jennet/Janet and Squire Davis, and wife of William G Burr

1871 census In the midst of chaos, baby Isabella Davis is born. The year is 1860. Daughter of the Haudenosaunee’s Squire (Albert? Richard?) Davis (1825-1886) and Scottish immigrant Jennet/Jenett/Janet Ferguson Davis (1825-1905), Isabella has a steady and healthy existence for most of her adult life – but her early years have their share of tumult... Read more …

There is a difference: United Empire Loyalists (UEL) and late loyalists

The American Revolution blazes a hasty trail to British Québec and the blazing continues into Upper and Lower Canada until 1815. Two kinds of American folkways come to Upper and Lower Canada: first round (pro British) in 1784, and second round (pro American) in 1790. Ruth McConnell says the immediate effect of the American Revolution (1775-1783)... Read more …

“Canajoharie Joseph Brant” and Thayendanegea’s mansion

There is much to love in James Paxton’s Joseph Brant and his world: 18th century Mohawk warrior and statesman (2008). Exceptional writing and heart-rending illustrations and even the book’s silky pages. More to love is Paxton’s thesis: Joseph Brant is an 18th century Mohawk warrior and Pine Tree Chief who understands as well as any modern Canadian the necessity... Read more …

The Grand River Navigation Company Swindle

This story is about a scandal. By the time the digging stops on the Grand River Navigation canal system, the British will have, once again, robbed and left destitute the Indigenous allies.   Upper Canada’s William Hamilton Merritt and David Thompson 1 are entrepreneurs and visionaries and they catch a bug. They catch “canal fever,” which, along with... Read more …