Jedidiah Golden

“Jeddah” or the “Snowman.” He is a neighbour of the Fergusons. He is a hired gun and the owner of a horse stock farm in Uxbridge. From Smoky Mountains in West Virginia of Appalachia Jeddah and Nellah Golden are the great grandchildren of a Butler’s Ranger, Loyalist and former Algerian Eduard Blaize. Eudora Gourlay, is deceased and Jeddah is a widower. Jeddah has two teenage daughters, Miss Hattie and Miss Hedy.

Stories that feature Jedidiah Golden

Trumpeting the Mohawk trilogy

SKY WALKER TEHAWENNIHÁRHOS: CHARTER “Another highlight comes in the minor characters, who are brought to life in a multidimensional way that makes the . . . universe immersive and realistic. All characters leave a lasting impression, even those as tertiary as Miles Finlen, the tall, gruff barkeep who works tirelessly to maintain respect for his bar... Read more …

United Empire Loyalists versus late loyalists

The American Revolution blazes a hasty trail to British Québec and the blazing continues into Upper and Lower Canada until 1815. Two kinds of American folkways come to Upper and Lower Canada: first round (pro British) in 1784, and second round (pro American) post 1790. Ruth McConnell says the immediate effect of the American Revolution (1775-1783)... Read more …

The Grand River Navigation Company Swindle

This story is about a scandal – a scandal of incredible proportion. By the time the digging stops on the Grand River Navigation canal system, the Crown will have, once again, robbed and left destitute its Indigenous allies.   Upper Canada’s William Hamilton Merritt and David Thompson 1 are entrepreneurs and visionaries and they catch a bug.... Read more …

The Markham Gang Ontario

“Gang members took an oath of secrecy. They vowed to support each other in any way possible. They pledged to provide alibis in case they were arrested, and to back each other in court. This was a homegrown, nineteenth century Canadian ‘Mafia,’ a ‘mob,’ one of the earliest known cases of organized crime in British... Read more …

The War of 1812: ‘The Bloody Assize’ and the creation of a Canadian folkway

“The contortions of the poor men so shook the loosely constructed gallows that a heavy brace became loosened and fell, striking one of the victims on the head and killing him instantly, thus relieving him from the tortures of the rope. After the men had been duly strangled, their heads were chopped off and exhibited... Read more …