The Trials of Sara Jeannette Duncan

In Rob Reiner’s A Few Good Men, Colonel Jessup famously shouts to the people-at-large, “You can’t handle the truth.” In protest, Nathan Heller (New Yorker 2014) shouts back: “Truth is the new standard for the messy work of power, and, for the first time in a long time, we’re ready to handle it.” Are you ready,… Read more …

Smoke Johnson, George Johnson, Barton Farr, Pauline Johnson

“For the rest of his life Skunny Wundy told anybody who would listen the story of his encounter with the Stone Giant(s), but nobody ever believed him.” Arthur Caswell Parker, Collected Stories of Skunny Wundy.  A.C. Parker   On his life journey, lower Mohawk Squire Davis, Tehawennihárhos, faces off with stone giants – as, one… Read more …

Ruthven Hall

What Squire heard about Klock was true and arriving at Indiana that evening he was astounded by what he saw. Almost complete Ruthven Hall was inconceivable. A massive building. A fortress. Heaven high pillars and a portico and a persistent symmetry showed in every aspect of the construction. He stopped in his tracks to study the… Read more …

Bruce Emerson Hill, and the GRAND RIVER NAVIGATION COMPANY scandal

“The Grand River project was unique in one particular way. It was the only major project in Canadian history financed by Indian funds.  . . . Their total investment subscribed without their knowledge or consent, amounted to over £40 000. Over a hundred years of protest by the Six Nations Indians and the periodical efforts of lawyers… Read more …

Margaret Riley Davis and Bow Park Farm: a monstrous theft!

NEWS BRANTFORD – Rumours have haunted Oxbow Road for decades By Heather Ibbotson, Brantford Expositor Tuesday, August 7, 2007 12:00:00 EDT AM ‘Tales of murder, mayhem and the macabre have haunted Oxbow Road for at least 30 years. Variations on a horror-movie theme have evolved and mutated of their own accord into ever more gruesome tales of… Read more …

Carolinian Forest and the Grand River

In 1791 after the American rebellion and the ensuing flood of American-speaking displaced persons arrive into the upper country, Great Britain takes it upon itself to divide Quebec into Lower and Upper Canada. Upper Canada, which the British claim but do not own and do not conquer – actually Upper Canada is the territories-depending-thereon part of… Read more …

The Grand River. Ouse. Tinaatoua.

The Grand River is situated  in southwestern Ontario. From its source near Wareham it flows southeast through the Grand valley–Fergus, Elora, Waterloo, Kitchener, Galt/Cambridge, Paris, Brantford, Ohsweken, Caledonia, and Cayuga–before emptying into the north shore of Lake Erie south of Dunnville at Port Maitland. 1 In 1784 the Grand River/Tinaatoua and lands adjacent to the river… Read more …

Pauline Johnson and the (missing) wampum belt

From the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology – final note on the return of the wampum belts Pauline Johnson sold to George Heye for $500: “It is therefore recommended that the National Museum of the American Indian repatriate NMAI 008386.000 to the Haudenosaunee Standing Committee on Burial Rules and Regulations on behalf… Read more …

Davis vs Styres, and the case of lot 45

Squire Davis has several run-ins with the authorities. Here is one. Squire’s claim to property in the Township of Onondaga on the Six Nations Reserve is contentious. Squire stands accused of getting a man inebriated, encouraging said fellow to sign a quit claim, vis-à-vis lot 45, and, if all this isn’t sketchy enough, a certain… Read more …

CAYUGA 14 Indians. CHIEF DESKAHEH

“Considering that Ruthven was situated on or very near the land that was sacred to the Cayuga Indians, and considering that a number of Indians ‘sold land improvements’ to [David] Thompson I, it is reasonable to assume that there must have been more than 14 Indians in Indiana over these years.” Laura Kathleen Quirk, The… Read more …