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North America BECKERT, SVEN. Empire of Cotton: A Global History. New York: Vintage Books, 20 BERNARD, SHANE and GIROUARD, JULIA. 1992. “’Colinda’: Mysterious Origins of a Cajun Folksong.” Journal of Folklore Research 29 (1). Indiana University Press: 37–52. http://www.jstor.org/stable/381428 BOYCE, DOUGLAS. 1973. “A Glimpse of Iroquois Culture History through the Eyes of Joseph Brant and John Norton.” Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 117 (4). American Philosophical Society: 286–94.  BRUMWELL, STEPHEN. White Devil: A True Story of War, Savagery, and Vengeance in Colonial…

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Davis vs Styres, and David Thorburn

Davis vs Styres, and David Thorburn

Squire Davis had several run-ins with the authorities. Was he a forerunner of #IdleNoMore, or a scofflaw, or both? Squire’s claim to property in the Township of Onondaga in the Six Nations territory was contentious. Squire stood accused of getting a man inebriated, encouraging said fellow to sign a quit claim, re: RR45, and, if all this wasn’t sketchy enough, a certain Hilton Hill (H. H.) suggests Squire turned the poor befuddled fellow, namely Joseph Miller, over to the Union…

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Bruce Emerson Hill: The GRAND RIVER NAVIGATION COMPANY scandal

Bruce Emerson Hill: The GRAND RIVER NAVIGATION COMPANY scandal

“The Grand River project was unique in one particular way. It was the only major project in Canadian history financed by Indian funds.  . . . Their total investment subscribed without their knowledge or consent, amounted to over £40 000. Over a hundred years of protest by the Six Nations Indians and the periodical efforts of lawyers have not reimbursed them.” B. E. Hill   Bruce Hill brings to light a serious 19th-century financial and land-jobbing scandal. Unvested writers, historians and archaeologists…

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Pauline Johnson and the (missing) wampum belt

Pauline Johnson and the (missing) wampum belt

From the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology – final note on the return of the wampum belts Pauline Johnson sold to George Heye for $500: “It is therefore recommended that the National Museum of the American Indian repatriate NMAI 008386.000 to the Haudenosaunee Standing Committee on Burial Rules and Regulations on behalf of the Six Nations of the Grand River.” Pauline Johnson   CULTURAL AFFILIATION Although Ms Gilkison’s* record of the reading of NMAI 008683.000 does not…

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Ruthven Hall

Ruthven Hall

What Squire heard about Klock was true and arriving at Indiana that evening he was astounded by what he saw. Almost complete Ruthven Hall was inconceivable. A massive building. A fortress. Heaven high pillars and a portico and a persistent symmetry showed in every aspect of the construction. He stopped in his tracks to study the form. Prominent even to the gods the hall was a stone monolith. Permanent. Right-angled. Monumental. English. Not Greek like people said. Space was a menace. A…

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Margaret Riley Davis and Bow Park Farm: a monstrous theft

Margaret Riley Davis and Bow Park Farm: a monstrous theft

NEWS BRANTFORD – Rumours have haunted Oxbow Road for decades By Heather Ibbotson, Brantford Expositor Tuesday, August 7, 2007 12:00:00 EDT AM ‘Tales of murder, mayhem and the macabre have haunted Oxbow Road for at least 30 years. Variations on a horror-movie theme have evolved and mutated of their own accord into ever more gruesome tales of triple homicide, dead babies, blood-splattered walls and headless ghosts. Unfortunately for Hollywood, the whole thing is hogwash. There is no evidence of a murder, heinous or otherwise,…

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Carolinian Forest and the Grand River

Carolinian Forest and the Grand River

In 1791 after the American rebellion and the ensuing flood of American-speaking displaced persons arrive into the upper country, Great Britain takes it upon itself to divide Quebec into Lower and Upper Canada. Upper Canada, which the British claim but do not own and do not conquer – actually Upper Canada is the territories-depending-thereon part of Quebec –  holds a treasure. Embedded in the southern part of the province is woodland. A section of the colossal Carolinian forest tips as far north…

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The Grand River. Ouse. Tinaatoua.

The Grand River. Ouse. Tinaatoua.

The Grand River is situated  in southwestern Ontario. From its source near Wareham it flows southeast through the Grand valley–Fergus, Elora, Waterloo, Kitchener, Galt/Cambridge, Paris, Brantford, Ohsweken, Caledonia, and Cayuga–before emptying into the north shore of Lake Erie south of Dunnville at Port Maitland. 1 In 1784 the Grand River/Tinaatoua and lands adjacent to the river for six miles on either side, including timber and minerals, were the property and within the sovereignty of the Six Nations Confederacy, allies of the British Crown during the…

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